Barranquilla Carnival 2020 is the world’s second biggest Carnival

Barranquilla Carnival is one of the world’s great carnival celebrations.

Barranquilla Carnival 2020

The main events of Barranquilla Carnival in Barranquilla, Colombia are Saturday-Tuesday, February 22-25, 2020, but the pre-Carnival party starts about two weeks earlier.

Book your travel early and join the pre-Carnival celebrations if you can. That way you will know your way around when the party gets hot.


Barranquilla Carnival 2019

The 2019 theme is ¡Para que lo baile todo el mundo! (For everyone to dance!)

¡Para que lo baile todo el mundo! (For everyone to dance!)

There is a big buildup for the entire month before the parades which are the main event.

La Guacherna

This night parade gets things going on Friday, February 22.

Children’s Parade

The Children’s Parade is on Sunday, February 24.

Carnival Queen’s Coronation

Barranquilla Carnival King Momo and 2019 Carnival Queen Carolina Secebre Abudinen. Courtesy Barranquilla Carnival.

Barranquilla Carnival King Momo and 2019 Carnival Queen Carolina Secebre Abudinen. Courtesy Barranquilla Carnival.

Dancing in the street starts at 5pm. The Carnival Queen’s coronation is in Estadio Romelio Martinez on Thursday, February 28 at 8pm.

Colombian vallenato star Carlos Vives is invited. The 2019 Barranquilla Carnival Queen is Carolina Secebre Abudinen.

The first Carnival Queen was crowned over a hundred years ago in 1918.

Carnival Concert

The concert marks the beginning of the climax of Carnival.

This year’s Carnival concert features Marc Anthony, Silvestre Dangond, Peter Manjarrés, Checo Acosta and Trapical Minds in Estadio Romelio Martínez on Friday, March 1 at 8pm.

The Battle of the Flowers

The first Battle of the Flowers was held in 1903. This year it is on Via 40 on Saturday, March 2 at 12pm. The Parade runs for five or six hours.

The King Momo Parade is on Calle 17 at 2pm.

At 5pm there is comic theatre in Parque Metropolitano and dancing in the street.

Great Parade of Tradition and Folklore

This is sort of the people’s parade. It is all people without any floats. It features cumbia, folkloric and other dancing. Over 300 dancing groups march every year.

The Parade of Tradition and Folkore is on Via 40 on Sunday, March 3 at 1pm.

There is dancing in the street to a night of orchestras at Par Vial Car. 50 at 5pm.

There is comic theatre in Parque Olaya and spoken word in Barrio Abajo at 5pm.

Great Parade of Groups

This is the big showcase Parade. It has floats and more choreography. It is on Via 40 on Monday, March 4 at 1pm.

The fun starts with a festival of orchestras in Plaza de la Paz at 11am.

After the Parade, there is comic theatre in Parque Calancala at 5pm.

Joselito Leaves with the Ashes

Barranquilla Carnival ends with the ritual burial of Joselito, a character who symbolizes the joy and freedom of Carnival. It’s the equivalent of Fat Tuesday (Mardi Gras).

There is comic theatre in Parque Almendra at 2pm.

People march through the streets pulling Joselito in coffins or stretchers at Carrera 54 calle 58 at 4pm.

It’s a great party, Colombian style.

#PuraAlegria (Pure Joy)


Carnival

Carnival is a reverse-festival where social structures are turned upside down. Slaves had more freedom and masters had to give in a little.

It grew out of ancient farm-economy traditions in northern Italy. There was less work to do, beer from the previous season’s harvest, and meat slaughtered the previous fall had to be eaten before it spoiled. Hence “carne-va” (the meat goes).

Put that all together and you have the world’s biggest Latin party.

Old traditions have a certain logic. Many babies are conceived during Carnival. Carnival babies are born the next winter which avoids disrupting planting and harvest work.

The party builds up to Fat Tuesday.  Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of Lent, the Catholic period of fasting and religious piety leading up to Easter. In a way we had to fast because we ate all the food from the previous harvest. Then we get serious and prepare to plant in the spring around Easter.


Barranquilla Carnival

Barranquilla Carnival is the world’s second biggest Carnival festival after Rio. Its origins are hidden by the mists of time, but Barranquilla Carnival goes back beyond at least 1888 when King Momo first reigned.

King Momo reigns over the land of dreams and the crazy. He protects Carnival-goers from harm and scandal. Colombia is a very conservative country, but when King Momo reigns, it’s okay to party (actually we always love to party).

The Festival’s slogan is “quien lo vive, es quien lo goza” (those who live it are those who enjoy it).

UNESCO, the UN cultural agency, declared Barranquilla Carnival a Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity in 2003.

Barranquilla

Barranquilla is a Caribbean city on the mouth of the Magdalena River, the great river of Colombia. It is a special place because unlike other Colombian cities, it was founded by local Caribs, Arawaks and Africans, not the Spanish colonizers.

Being at the mouth of the Magdalena gives Barranquilla a unique blend of influences from the Colombian interior and the Caribbean. Many places in Barranquilla still carry the names given them by the Mocaná, the biggest Indigenous group in the region.

Marimonda

Like many countries, Colombia has its own favorite Carnival characters. They often make fun of tough characters like devils, colonial masters and so on.

People prepare their Carnival costumes all year long. Marimonda was created by a fellow in Barranquilla who was too poor to afford a fancy Carnival costume so he made his own using old clothes and a bag.

Marimonda shakes his legs, waves his arms like a chicken, and dances like he is being attacked by ants. He is pure fun, Barranquilla style.


Barranquilla Carnival Tickets

The party is all over the streets, but you can buy tickets for seating at tuboleta.com

Palcos are box bleacher seats. Minipalcos are mini-box seats.


Traveling to Barranquilla

Book your travel and lodging early because Barranquilla fills up during Carnival and prices are higher.

Colombian/Latin American airline Avianca has the most options for flying from New York City to Barranquilla.

For more information, visit carnavaldebarranquilla.org


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