Caribbean


New York Mets vs Miami Marlins at Citi Field in Queens

Major League Baseball
Yankee Stadium, The Bronx
Friday – Sunday
August 18-20, 2017

Harlem Havana 2017 celebrates Afro-Cuban music and culture

Harlem
August 12-23, 2017

Gerardo Contino y Los Habaneros is NYC’s best Cuban Salsa dance band

Highline Ballroom
431 West 16th St, Chelsea
Friday, August 18, 2017

SummerStage 2017 free concerts in NYC parks

Latin artists June 21 – August 25, 2017
Last Latin artist this season
Anat Cohen Tentet
Charlie Parker Jazz Festival
Marcus Garvey Park Harlem
Friday, August 25, 2017

New York Mets vs Miami Marlins at Citi Field in Queens

Major League Baseball
Yankee Stadium, The Bronx
Friday – Sunday
August 18-20, 2017

Battery Dance Festival is a free public dance festival of international artists

Robert F. Wagner Jr. Park
Battery Park City
August 13-18, 2017
Schimmel Center
August 19, 2017

Assumption of Mary celebrates the Virgin’s journey into heaven

August 15

Dominican Day Parade Gala

Meet NYC’s Dominican leaders
Dyker Beach Golf Club
Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn
Friday, August 11, 2017

NYC Broadway Week Summer 2017 2-for-1 tickets On Sale Now

On Sale August 17, 2017
Shows September 4-17, 2017

Roberto Clemente was the first great Latin Major League Baseball player

Born August 18, 1934 in Barrio San Antón, Carolina, Puerto Rico

New York Mets vs Miami Marlins at Citi Field in Queens

Major League Baseball
Yankee Stadium, The Bronx
Friday – Sunday
August 18-20, 2017

Luis Fonsi breaks cultural borders with Despacito Remix, and not slowly

Puerto Rican Reggaeton with Daddy Yankee, featuring Justin Bieber
Billboard Hot 100 #1


South American


 

Chimichurri Grill is NYC’s most elegant Argentine restaurant

Homemade empanadas, meats, pastas and desserts
133 East 61st Street
Upper East Side

NYC Broadway Week Summer 2017 2-for-1 tickets On Sale Now

On Sale August 17, 2017
Shows September 4-17, 2017

Central Park Tango is a romantic way to spend a Summer Saturday evening

Shakespeare Statue
June through September
Saturdays

Dance Tango to live music at Zinc Bar

Enigma Tango Trio
82 W 3rd St, Greenwich Village
Sundays, August 2017

SummerStage 2017 free concerts in NYC parks

Latin artists June 21 – August 25, 2017
Last Latin artist this season
Anat Cohen Tentet
Charlie Parker Jazz Festival
Marcus Garvey Park Harlem
Friday, August 25, 2017

Brazil vs Ecuador World Cup qualifier

Arena do Grêmio
Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
Thursday, August 31, 2017

Metropolitan Opera 2017-18 Season brings 25 works and five new productions

Season premiere
New production of Bellini’s Italian opera Norma
Monday, September 25, 2017

Brazilian Day New York 2017 is the biggest Brazilian event outside Brazil

Little Brazil
46th St at Sixth Avenue
Midtown
Sunday, September 3, 2017

NYC Broadway Week Summer 2017 2-for-1 tickets On Sale Now

On Sale August 17, 2017
Shows September 4-17, 2017

Bulla en el Barrio sings Colombian Bullerengue featuring Emilsen Pacheco

David Rubenstein Atrium
Lincoln Center
Thursday, August 24, 2017

SummerStage 2017 free concerts in NYC parks

Latin artists June 21 – August 25, 2017
Last Latin artist this season
Anat Cohen Tentet
Charlie Parker Jazz Festival
Marcus Garvey Park Harlem
Friday, August 25, 2017

Colombia Soccer World Cup Qualifer Venezuela vs Colombia

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Assumption of Mary celebrates the Virgin’s journey into heaven

August 15

Lincoln Center Out of Doors 2018 free music, dance and spoken word

Damrosch Park & Hearst Plaza
Lincoln Center
July and August 2018

Dance Parade 2018

Flatiron District to Tompkins Square Park
East Village
Saturday, May 19, 2018

Ecuadorian Independence Day is August 10

Criollo rebels took Quito
August 10, 1809

Assumption of Mary celebrates the Virgin’s journey into heaven

August 15

Hispanic Heritage Month 2017

Celebrate our Hispanic heritage
September 15 – October 25

Peruvian Independence Day is July 28

Celebrate the Peruvian declaration of independence from Spain
July 28, 1824

Pachamama is Andean Earth Day

August 1


North American


 

New York Mets vs Miami Marlins at Citi Field in Queens

Major League Baseball
Yankee Stadium, The Bronx
Friday – Sunday
August 18-20, 2017

SummerStage 2017 free concerts in NYC parks

Latin artists June 21 – August 25, 2017
Last Latin artist this season
Anat Cohen Tentet
Charlie Parker Jazz Festival
Marcus Garvey Park Harlem
Friday, August 25, 2017

Metropolitan Opera 2017-18 Season brings 25 works and five new productions

Season premiere
New production of Bellini’s Italian opera Norma
Monday, September 25, 2017

Gloria Trevi is the Mexican Madonna

Madison Square Garden
Saturday, August 12, 2017


European


 

Real Madrid La Liga season opener Peña Madridista NYC

Peña Madridista NYC
Playwright Irish Pub
27 West 35th St, Chelsea
Sunday, August 20, 2017

SummerStage 2017 free concerts in NYC parks

Latin artists June 21 – August 25, 2017
Last Latin artist this season
Anat Cohen Tentet
Charlie Parker Jazz Festival
Marcus Garvey Park Harlem
Friday, August 25, 2017

Assumption of Mary celebrates the Virgin’s journey into heaven

August 15

Frieze New York 2018 is NYC’s big May contemporary art fair

Randall’s Island
Thursday-Saturday
May 3-5, 2018

Barcelona vs Real Betis La Liga season opener Penya FC Barcelona NYC

Smithfield Hall NYC
138 West 25th St, Chelsea
Sunday, August 20, 2017

Battery Dance Festival is a free public dance festival of international artists

Robert F. Wagner Jr. Park
Battery Park City
August 13-18, 2017
Schimmel Center
August 19, 2017

Real Madrid La Liga season opener Peña Madridista NYC

Peña Madridista NYC
Playwright Irish Pub
27 West 35th St, Chelsea
Sunday, August 20, 2017

Atlético Madrid Peña Oficial Atlético de Madrid en New York

Football Factory at Legends
La Liga Season Opener
Girona vs Atlético Madrid
Saturday, August 19, 2017

The meaning of the word Latin changes with time. Today it generally refers to the Native + European + African mix of the Americas. However, the origins of Latin culture are the very foundation of Western civilization.

Like the Tree of Life itself, any honest examination of the human story leads away from branches of difference towards shared roots.

Our shared Western heritage is Greek. Greeks started the process of humanizing the gods and empowering the individual. This process continues today in a proverbial “two steps forward, one step back” dance across the ages.

Latin culture begins in Italy. Greek culture wasn’t copied, it was absorbed from Greek migrants in the boot of Italy and the shores of Sicily. Migrants still seek these shores today.

The Romans spread Latin culture around the Mediterranean (27 BC – 476 AD). Romans loved silk. Venice controlled the oriental trade and absorbed oriental influences.

When Rome declined, what is now Spain and Portugal did not decline as badly. French are a Germanic people who remained “Latinized” from their Roman period. The Germanic mind and the Latin heart in the French are an enviable combination when they work together.

For better or sometimes for worse, the Roman Catholic church was for a long time the last pillar of Western Civilization. The church’s influence on life and therefore culture was profound, even as it began dividing into Oriental and Eastern orthodoxy, and later Protestant religions.

The Mediterranean Sea is essentially a big lake. Phoenicians (Lebanese), Greeks, and Jews settled around its shores. Their cultures added important elements to the mix.

The Moorish conquest of Spain between (711 and 1492) and Sicily (827-902) added Islamic influences. When they worked together, Christians, Jews, and Muslims created the most advanced civilization of their time and resurrected the ancient roots of Western Civilization.

The Italian Renaissance (circa 1300s – 1500s) began to bring light back to Europe. The Renaissance is the foundation of contemporary Western civilization.

The Portuguese began exploring the African coast  in 1419. They eventually made it to the Orient.

The Ottoman takeover of Constantinople (1453) closed ancient trade routes. This pushed traders to the sea looking for another way to the Orient.

The Spanish Golden Age (1492-1659) brought Europeans, and forced Jews and Africans to the Americas. The conquistadores planted the first orange trees in Florida. The Spanish conquest of the Aztecs (1521), the Incas (1572), and the Maya (1697) folded Native American cultures into the mix.

Cuba was the main port of the Spanish transatlantic trade in plunder and slaves. There African and Spanish mixed into what we now think of as Latin. This culture spread across the Spanish-speaking Americas.

In 1524 Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano discovered New York Bay for a French king.

The first African slaves arrived in what is now New York City in 1626. There was a slave market on the east end of Wall Street. New York slaves came from Cuba.

The French coined the term “Amérique latine” (Latin American) while trying to conquer Mexico in the 1830s. Latin American leaders adopted the term because of its connection to the great military and cultural power of the time.

Colonial power in the Americas led Latin Americans to look to European culture as the best. Colonization left diverse and rich cultural blends. It also left dysfunctional political and economic structures which are still unwinding today.

Jazz became recognizable in African communities at the turn of the 20th century. Jelly Roll Morton’s “Spanish tinge” was Cuban. The ferry ran twice a day between New Orleans and Havana.

The main wave of Italian immigrants to New York City came between 1900-1910. They first settled in East Harlem.

In 1940, Cubans Mario Bauzá and Machito Grillo formed the Machito and his Afro-Cubans orchestra. They created Latin Jazz as we know it and caught the ear of Dizzy Gillespie.

World War II (1939-1945) moved the world’s cultural center from Paris to New York.

In the 1950s Celia Cruz popularized Cuban music across Latin America. Tito Puente and others popularized Cuban music in the United States. Since the 1950s, Latin has meant Latin American, or the countries south of the United States.

The “Great Migration” from Puerto Rico to New York City in the 1950s gave “Latin” a Puerto Rican meaning. East Harlem became known as “Spanish Harlem” or “El Barrio.”

In the 1970s, Cuban music played mostly by New York Puerto Ricans went global out of New York City. It was called Salsa. That music and dance went everywhere and has spawned endless variations.

Latin culture is so popular now that even people who aren’t Latin by birth are part of the culture.

Mexico is the global center of all forms of Spanish-language publishing. Mexican-Americans are the Hispanic majority in the United States. So Latin is beginning to mean Mexican-American.

Most Hispanic immigration to New York City is now coming from the Caribbean (Dominican) and South America (Ecuadorian and Colombian).

Mexico has the world’s largest Spanish-speaking population. The United States is second. Brazil has the largest Portuguese-speaking population. France and Canada are the second and third largest French-speaking countries.

There are large Middle Eastern and Asian communities in Central and South America.

The global icon of New York City, the Statue of Liberty, is French.

So who is Latin? Whatever you are, we are all a little bit Latin.

Central America is actually part of the North American continent. Central America is a cultural concept like the distinction between Europe and Asia. There is no divide except in the minds of some politicians.

In fact about one-third of the United States was Mexico until gold was discovered in California. Then we cooked up a war to take the land. There is an old saying that, “We didn’t cross the border. The border crossed us.”

Central America is the ancient home of the great Olmec, Maya, and Aztec cultures.

Mexico City, the ancient capital of the Aztecs, was the old Spanish capital of North America. Later Central America was controlled from Guatemala.

Panama was originally part of Colombia and was considered part of South America. Then we convinced the Colombians to give it up so we could finish the Panama canal started by the French.

The amount of silver taken by the Spanish out of Mexico paid for those beautiful old buildings in Spain and created financial imbalances around the globe. It’s an old story, but it is incredible to think that globalization has been going on for hundreds of years.


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