Hispanic Heritage Month 2019

The U.S. national celebration of our Hispanic roots is September 15 – October 15

Panamanian Parade 2019

Saturday, October 12, 2019
CROWN HEIGHTS, Brooklyn ~ America’s biggest celebration of Panamanian culture is a parade from Bergen St & Franklin Ave to a street fair along Prospect Park on Classon Ave between Eastern Parkway & President St

Hispanic Day Parade 2019

Sunday, October 13, 2019
MIDTOWN, NYC ~ Twenty-one countries from around the world celebrate our Hispanic Heritage on Fifth Avenue

Broadway celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month with an Ana Villafañe cabaret

Sunday, October 13, 2019
TIMES SQUARE THEATER DISTRICT ~ Ana Villafañe of Broadway’s ‘On Your Feet!’ and NBC’s ‘Sunnyside’ and ‘New Amsterdam’ hosts a ¡Viva Broadway! cabaret concert series at the W Hotel

The Columbus Day Parade is America’s biggest Italian-American celebration

Monday, October 14, 2019
MIDTOWN, NYC ~ Grand Marshal Massimo Ferragamo leads over 100 marching groups, 24 parade floats, 35 vehicles and over 20 marching bands in this celebration of Italian-American heritage, culture and achievements

Columbus Day Weekend 2020

Fri-Mon, October 9-12, 2020
NEW YORK CITY ~ Discover a world of Latin things to do over Columbus Day Weekend, New York City’s big Italian and Indigenous celebration

Celebrate Spain’s National Day, La Fiesta Nacional de España

Saturday, October 12, 2019
BAHAMAS ~ When Rodrigo de Triana, a lookout on the first expedition of Columbus, sighted land on October 12, 1492, he had no idea he set in motion one of the great turning points in history

Celebrate Columbus Day 2020

Monday, October 12, 2020
MIDTOWN, NYC ~ This national holiday is the Italian-American celebration in the United States. It was created to reduce racist violence against Italian-Americans. The myths around Columbus Day helped Italian-Americans be accepted as just Americans. Benvenuto! Grazie! Saluto!

Celebrate Mexico Now Festival

Mon-Sun, October 7-13, 2019
NEW YORK CITY ~ A festival of contemporary Mexican art, dance, film, literature, music and food curated by New York City’s leading producer of world-class Mexican culture

Salvadoran Independence Day

Tuesday, September 15, 2020
GUATEMALA CITY ~ A regional congress signed “The Act of Independence of Central America” (modern Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Salvador) on September 15, 1821

Costa Rican Independence Day

Tuesday, September 15, 2020
GUATEMALA CITY ~ A regional congress signed “The Act of Independence of Central America” (modern Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Salvador) on September 15, 1821

Guatemalan Independence Day

Tuesday, September 15, 2020
GUATEMALA CITY ~ A regional congress signed “The Act of Independence of Central America” (modern Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Salvador) on September 15, 1821

Nicaraguan Independence Day

Tuesday, September 15, 2020
GUATEMALA CITY ~ A regional congress signed “The Act of Independence of Central America” creating modern Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Salvador) on September 15, 1821

Honduran Independence Day

Tuesday, September 15, 2020
GUATEMALA CITY ~ A regional congress signed “The Act of Independence of Central America” (modern Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Salvador) on September 15, 1821

Mexican Independence Day ¡Viva Mexico!

Wednesday, September 16, 2020
DOLORES HIDALGO, Mexico ~ The Mexican Revolution began with a call to arms, “El Grito de Dolores” (The Cry of Dolores) on September 16, 1810

Contact us to let us know about your Hispanic Heritage Month events.


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Things to do in NYC during Hispanic Heritage Month

October 2019 New York Latin Culture Calendar

OCTOBER 2019
1-13 Fall for Dance Festival
2 Sandy e Junior
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7-13 Celebrate Mexico Now
8-9 Yom Kippur
11-14 COLUMBUS DAY WEEKEND
11-13 New Yorker Festival
12 Panamanian Day Parade
12 Spain’s National Day
13 Hispanic Day Parade
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14 COLUMBUS DAY
14 Columbus Day Parade
14 Indigenous People’s Day
15 Hispanic Heritage Month ends
15 Casita Maria Gala
(19-20) ColombiaFest
20 Queens Bolivian Day Parade
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21 MoMA reopens
23 World Ballet Day
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31 Winter Village
31 Halloween Parade

September 2019 New York Latin Culture Calendar

1 Brazilian Day
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2 LABOR DAY
2 West Indian Day Parade
3-16 NYC Broadway Week
5 Socrates Annual
6-14 New York Fashion Week
7 New York City Labor Day Parade
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11 New York Philharmonic Opening Night ~ ‘Close Encounters of the Third Kind’
12 Jazz at Lincoln Center Season Opener
12 Crossing the Line festival
12-22 Feast of San Gennaro
15 Hispanic Heritage Month
15 Costa Rican, Guatemalan, Honduran, Nicaraguan, Salvadoran Independence Day
15 African American Day Parade
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16 Mexican Independence Day
17-30 UN General Assembly
17-13 New York City Ballet Fall Season
22 Queens Hispanic Day Parade
22 Peru to the World Expo
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23-6 NYC Off-Broadway Week
23 Met Opera Opening Night Gala ~ ‘Porgy and Bess’
27 New York Film Festival
29-1 Rosh Hashanah
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Hispanic Heritage Month is an annual U.S. government celebration of the Hispanic contributions to our American culture from September 15 – October 25.

The contributions are great. The western third of our country and Florida were New Spain before they were the United States. Hispanic culture remains embedded there.

Spain played a major role in the recovery of western civilization during the Middle Ages. The combination of Muslim leaders, Jewish poets and a Christian populace together recovered the legacy of western civilization from the Islamic libraries of the eastern Mediterranean.

We couldn’t be who we are today without our Hispanic heritage.


 

It is a little odd that Hispanic Heritage Month starts in the middle of the month. It was set up this way to include the independence days of several North American, Central American and South American countries, along with the anniversary of the “discovery” of the Americas by Christopher Columbus.

  • September 15 is independence day in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua.
  • September 16 is Mexico’s independence day (no, it’s not Cinco de Mayo).
  • September 18 marks the “18th Mierda,” Chile’s independence celebration.
  • On October 12, 1492 Christopher Columbus rediscovered the Americas for the Europeans

 

The term “Hispanic” is complicated. Some think Hispanic refers to countries with a Spanish heritage.

Some think Hispanic includes Portuguese heritage, but most Brazilians do not consider themselves Hispanic.

“Latin” is a French term that includes the Latin Europeans (Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Romanian) and Latin Americans. France first promoted the idea of our shared Latinness while trying to conquer Mexico and fight against the American Union during the Civil War. Latin Americans rose to the idea because French culture was considered at the time to be the most sophisticated in the world.

“Latino” means “Latin man” or “Latin people” in Spanish. In popular usage in the United States, Latino has come to mean Mexican -American. New York City has large Caribbean and South American populations who are Latino as well.

“Hispanic” often conjures images of white Spaniards. Spaniards are themselves a great mix of European, African, Muslim and Romani peoples. Hispanic Americans, and I’m speaking of all the Americas, are a combination of Indigenous, African and European. No matter what we look like, our culture is very African.

What you consider to be Hispanic probably has more to do with your own heritage and education, and the biases that come with that.

In the end, the distinctions become silly because we all share a common great-great…African grandmother in the distant past.

Humans have been migrating ever since we got two feet.


 

We are far more Hispanic than we think.

When a crew member in the expedition of Christopher Columbus spotted land on October 12, 1492, he set in motion a world-changing series of events.

The Italian Columbus claimed the New World for his Spanish patrons. This brought the Dutch, English, French and Portuguese. The collision of civilizations decimated the Indigenous population and brought Africans to the Americas.

Spanish language, culture, and religion spread across much of the Americas, including the western third of what is now the United States. Though not strictly Hispanic, French language, culture, and religion spread across what is now Quebec, Canada and down the Mississippi River through the center of the United States to New Orleans.

In South America, Portuguese language, culture, and religion spread across what is now Brazil.

New York City was originally a Lenape trading post at the Battery in what is now downtown. The first immigrant was a Portuguese – African – Dominican named Juan (Jan) Rodriguez. He left a Dutch ship and set up a home at the trading post.

Eventually the Dutch set up a colony. At that time, the Netherlands was the Spanish Netherlands. It was ruled by King Philip IV of Spain from what is now the capital of Europe, Brussels, Belgium. So even New York City is Hispanic in a way.

Contemporary identity tends to be based on the last colonial power in a region. So though the Spanish were the original colonizers, Americans of the U.S. and Caribbean nations like Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago, consider England to be their mother country.

Cuba and the Philippines were the last possessions of the Spanish Empire and the first possessions of the American one.


 

Do you drink orange juice in the morning? Spanish conquistadors planted the first orange trees in Florida. They did this to protect Spanish sailors from scurvy, a disease caused by Vitamin C deficiency.

The oldest continuously settled city in the United States is St. Augustine, Florida. St. Augustine was founded by Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon. He was searching for the Fountain of Youth.

The American Southwest was Spanish and Mexican before it was American. That is about one-third of our country.


 

The Pew Research Center estimates the U.S. Hispanic population in 2016 at 57 million or 18% of the U.S. population. That is probably an underestimate because many Americans with a Hispanic heritage identify themselves as Caucasian.

Hispanics are the second-fastest-growing ethnic group in the United States. These numbers are making all Americans take notice.

Hispanic Heritage Month is important for those of us who have a direct Hispanic heritage. But it is probably more important for those of us Americans who are not Hispanic.

In life, it is important to know yourself. Our country is already at least 1/5 Hispanic. That is two fingers out of your ten. It’s worth knowing who we are, and who we are becoming.

Our Hispanic Heritage is a great blessing.