‘Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960 – 1985’ at the Brooklyn Museum

Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960 – 1985 is an exhibition of work by 120 artists from fifteen Latin countries who primarily use their bodies for political, social, and artistic expression.

The exhibition is on view at The Brooklyn Museum in Prospect Park, Wednesday – Sunday from April 13 – July 22, 2018.

#radicalwomenbkm


The Role of Women in Society

Given that women are generally the primary caregivers of children, I have often wondered why mindless machismo is allowed to continue unchecked.

Why have we allowed traditions that devalue women to pass from one generation to another? We have a lot to contribute. Any society that diminishes the contributions of half its people is doomed to fail in a globalized world.

Of course social progress is not easy. We work under the limitations of a patriarchal society. Machismo devalues or even completely disregards our work. Poverty limits our reach. The political environment in many Latin American countries makes it personally dangerous to advocate for change.

Anyway, we have been trying. To avoid shaming, arrest or worse, we often communicate in code. That brings us to art.

This exhibition arrives in America’s #MeToo moment. It couldn’t have been planned that way, but great art often has a mind of its own.


1960 – 1985

Work in the exhibition must be viewed in the context of its own time. This was a period of great social change and stirring globalization.

The 1960s brought a counterculture movement against the Vietnam War and for Civil Rights and the Chicano movement to the United States. 1967 produced a global explosion of youthful energy. The Gay Rights movement started in 1969. The time also brought dictatorship to many Latin American countries.

The 1970s brought environmentalism, women’s rights, and the sexual revolution to the forefront. New York City went bankrupt. Wall Street started investing overseas starting great economic changes in underdeveloped countries.

The 1980s brought us decolonization and the personal computer revolution.


Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960 – 1985

Artists are organized by country of birth or the country where they did most of their work.

The Brooklyn presentation also includes Nuyorican portraits by photographer Sophie Rivera, as well as work from Chicana graphic arts pioneer Ester Hernández, Cuban filmmaker Sara Gómez, and Afro-Latina activist and artist Marta Moreno Vega, founder of the Caribbean Cultural Center in Harlem.

Argentine Artists

  1. María Luisa Bemberg (1922–1995)
  2. Delia Cancela (b. 1940)
  3. Graciela Carnevale (b. 1942)
  4. Alicia d’Amico and Sara Facio (1933–2001 and b. 1932)
  5. Diana Dowek (b. 1942)
  6. Graciela Gutiérrez Marx (b. 1945)
  7. Narcisa Hirsch (b. Germany, 1928)
  8. Ana Kamien and Marilú Marini (b. 1935 and 1954)
  9. Lea Lublin (b. Poland, 1929–1999)
  10. Liliana Maresca (1951–1994)
  11. Marta Minujín (b. 1943)
  12. Marie Orensanz (b. 1936)
  13. Margarita Paksa (b. 1933)
  14. Liliana Porter (b. 1941)
  15. Dalila Puzzovio (b. 1943)
  16. Marcia Schvartz (b. 1955)

Brazilian Artists

  1. Mara Alvares (b. 1948)
  2. Claudia Andujar (b. Switzerland, 1931)
  3. Martha Araújo (b. 1943)
  4. Vera Chaves Barcellos (b. 1938)
  5. Lygia Clark (1920–1988)
  6. Analívia Cordeiro (b. 1954)
  7. Liliane Dardot (b. 1946)
  8. Lenora de Barros (b. 1953)
  9. Iole de Freitas (b. 1945)
  10. Anna Bella Geiger (b. 1933)
  11. Carmela Gross (b. 1946)
  12. Anna Maria Maiolino (b. Italy, 1942)
  13. Márcia X. (1959–2005)
  14. Ana Vitória Mussi (b. 1943)
  15. Lygia Pape (1927–2004)
  16. Letícia Parente (1930–1991)
  17. Wanda Pimentel (b. 1943)
  18. Neide Sá (b. 1940)
  19. Regina Silveira (b. 1939)
  20. Teresinha Soares (b. 1927)
  21. Amelia Toledo (1926–2017)
  22. Celeida Tostes (1929–1995)
  23. Regina Vater (b. 1943

Chilean Artists

  1. Gracia Barrios (b. 1927)
  2. Sybil Brintrup and Magali Meneses (b. 1954 and 1950)
  3. Roser Bru (b. Spain, 1923)
  4. Gloria Camiruaga (1941–2006)
  5. Luz Donoso (1921–2008)
  6. Diamela Eltit (b. 1949)
  7. Paz Errázuriz (b. 1944)
  8. Virginia Errázuriz (b. 1941)
  9. Catalina Parra (b. 1940)
  10. Lotty Rosenfeld (b. 1943)
  11. Janet Toro (b. 1963)
  12. Eugenia Vargas Pereira (b. 1949)
  13. Cecilia Vicuña (b. 1948)

Colombian Artists

  1. Alicia Barney (b. 1952)
  2. Delfina Bernal (b. 1941)
  3. Feliza Bursztyn (1933–1982)
  4. María Teresa Cano (b. 1960)
  5. Beatriz González (b. 1938)
  6. Sonia Gutiérrez (b. 1947)
  7. Karen Lamassonne (b. United States, 1954)
  8. Sandra Llano-Mejía (b. 1951)
  9. Clemencia Lucena (1945–1983)
  10. María Evelia Marmolejo (b. 1958)
  11. Sara Modiano (1951–2010)
  12. Rosa Navarro (b. 1955)
  13. Patricia Restrepo (b. 1954)
  14. Nirma Zárate (1936–1999)

Costa Rican Artists

  1. Victoria Cabezas (b. United States, 1950)

Cuban Artists

  1. Antonia Eiriz (1929–1995)
  2. Sara Gomez (1942–1974)
  3. Ana Mendieta (1948–1985)
  4. Marta María Pérez (b. 1959)
  5. Zilia Sánchez (b. 1928)

Guatemalan Artists

  1. Margarita Azurdia (1931–1998)

Mexican Artists

  1. Yolanda Andrade (b. 1950)
  2. Maris Bustamante (b. 1949)
  3. Ximena Cuevas (b. 1963)
  4. Lourdes Grobet (b. 1940)
  5. Silvia Gruner (b. 1959)
  6. Kati Horna (b. Hungary, 1912–2000)
  7. Graciela Iturbide (b. 1942)
  8. Ana Victoria Jiménez (b. 1941)
  9. Magali Lara (b. 1956)
  10. Mónica Mayer (b. 1954)
  11. Sarah Minter (1953–2016)
  12. Marta Palau (b. Spain, 1934)
  13. Polvo de Gallina Negra (active 1983–93)
  14. Carla Rippey (b. United States, 1950)
  15. Jesusa Rodríguez (b. 1955)
  16. Pola Weiss (1947–1990)

Panamanian Artists

  1. Sandra Eleta (b. 1942)

Paraguayan Artists

  1. Olga Blinder (1921–2008)
  2. Margarita Morselli (b. 1952)

Peruvian Artists

  1. Teresa Burga (b. 1935)
  2. Gloria Gómez-Sánchez (1921–2007)
  3. Johanna Hamann (1954–2017)
  4. Victoria Santa Cruz (1922–2014)

Puerto Rican Artists

  1. Poli Marichal (b. 1955)
  2. Frieda Medín (b. 1949)

United States Artists

  1. Celia Álvarez Muñoz (b. 1937)
  2. Judith F. Baca (b. 1946)
  3. Barbara Carrasco (b. 1955)
  4. Josely Carvalho (b. Brazil, 1942)
  5. Isabel Castro (b. Mexico, 1954)
  6. Ester Hernández (b. 1944)
  7. Yolanda López (b. 1942)
  8. María Martínez-Cañas (b. Cuba, 1960)
  9. Marta Moreno Vega (b. 1942)
  10. Sylvia Palacios Whitman (b. Chile, 1941)
  11. Sophie Rivera (b. 1938)
  12. Sylvia Salazar Simpson (b. 1939)
  13. Patssi Valdez (b. 1951)

Uruguayan Artists

  1. Nelbia Romero (1938–2015)
  2. Teresa Trujillo (b. 1937)

The exhibition is guest curated by Cecilia Fajardo-Hill and Andrea Giunta with Marcela Guerrero, former curatorial fellow, Hammer Museum. The Brooklyn presentation is organized by Catherine J. Morris, Sackler Senior Curator, and Carmen Hermo, Assistant Curator, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Brooklyn Museum.


Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960 – 1985 Tickets

Tickets are available at the door.

General Admission: $16
Students (Valid ID) or 65+: $10
19 and under: Free


Visiting the Brooklyn Museum

200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn,  NY 11238
(in Prospect Park at Washington Ave)

(718) 638-5000

Wednesday – Sunday: 11 am – 6 pm (10 pm Thursdays)
First Saturdays (except September): 11 am – 11 pm

Subway

(2) (3) to Eastern Parkway – Brooklyn Museum

Bus

B41 and B69 to Grand Army Plaza
B45 to St. Johns Place and Washington Ave


Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960 – 1985
Brooklyn Museum
Prospect Park, Brooklyn
Wednesday – Saturday
April 13 – July 22, 2018
$16

For more information, visit www.brooklynmuseum.org


 


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